National Center on Educational Outcomes Brief 15: Students with Disabilities and Chronic Absenteeism

Students with Disabilities 
National Center on Educational Outcomes Brief 15: Students with Disabilities and Chronic Absenteeism
https://bit.ly/2Ke9Mdi 
This brief provides information about chronic absenteeism and possible implications for students with disabilities when a state selects it as a measure of school quality or student success. The brief highlights both the benefits and potential risks in light of requirements in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504), and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The brief also suggests actions that states might consider taking to address chronic absences among students with disabilities at the state and local levels as they work to include this new measure in accountability systems. Published by ICI MN National Center on Educational Outcomes (NCEO).

MLTSS for People for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: Strategies for Success

Managed Long-term Services and Supports (MLTSS) 
MLTSS for People for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: Strategies for Success
https://bit.ly/2L8obcg 
The National Association of States United for Aging and Disabilities (NASUAD), along with the National Association of State Directors of Developmental Disabilities Services (NASDDDS) and Ari Ne’eman of Mysupport.com are the authors of this important report MLTSS for People for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: Strategies for Success. 
Because there are unique challenges in implementing a managed long-term services and supports (MLTSS) program for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), the report provides context on the intersection of program design and participant advocacy and outlines successful strategies for both states and health plans. Promising practices from the few MLTSS programs delivering I/DD services are highlighted throughout.  Check it out if your state is engaged in MLTSS or is thinking about/planning for the transition.  

Opportunities for Improving Programs and Services for Children with Disabilities 

Health Services 
Opportunities for Improving Programs and Services for Children with Disabilities 
Source: https://bit.ly/2k3LxDF 
While a variety of services and programs exist to support the needs of children with disabilities and their families, a focus on achieving specific near- and long-term goals that help prepare for adulthood and coordination of care within and across service sectors are integral to encouraging healthy growth and development, says a new 
report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.  The committee that conducted the study and wrote the report examined federal, state, and local programs and services in a range of areas, such as health care, special education, transition to adulthood, vocational rehabilitation, and social needs care.

Work-Life Balance & Disability

Source: http://work-life-disability.org/#home 

The NIDILRR-funded project on Getting and Keeping People with Disabilities in the Workforce: Negotiating Work, Life, and Disability recently debuted a new web resource, Work-Life Balance & Disability, resulting from the project’s exploration of individual and organizational factors that support effective work-life management among employed people with disabilities. The site includes personal stories, plain language research briefs, and other resources. A polling feature enables collection of data to help inform future projects related to the well-being and employment success of people with disabilities. The site will continue to be updated with new polling questions, featured publications, and more stories from employed people with disabilities.

Responsive Practice | Institute on Disability/UCED

“Responsive Practice builds on knowledge that providers already have and identifies opportunities to maximize wellness for individuals with disabilities,” explains Kimberly Phillips, DPH Principal Investigator and co-author of the training.” 

Source: Responsive Practice | Institute on Disability/UCED

Responsive Practice 
Responsive Practice: Providing Health Care & Screenings to Individuals with Disabilities 
https://bit.ly/2ryQ30t
The New Hampshire Disability and Public Health (DPH) project’s Responsive Practice training is now available online, on-demand, and is free for a limited time. Responsive Practice enhances health care providers’ ability to deliver disability-competent care that is accessible to people with intellectual, mobility, and other disabilities.

Activity for All Children | CDC

Everybody needs physical activity for good health. However, most children do not participate in any organized physical activity during non-school hours. See how inclusive after-school programs can help increase physical activity among children of all abilities.

Source: Activity for All Children | Features | CDC

Children and adolescents ages 6 years and older should perform at least one hour of physical activity each day. This amount of physical activity helps control weight, improves mental health, bone health and fitness, and reduces risk factors for chronic diseases such as heart disease and diabetes. Nevertheless, many children and adolescents are not getting this suggested amount of daily physical activity.

The lack of physical activity only increases for youth with a disability1. In fact, compared to youth without disability, youth with a disability have a 35 percent higher prevalence of overweight and obesity2 with an increased risk of secondary conditions associated with being overweight3.

After-school programs across the country have been working hard to provide opportunities for youth to get the recommended amount of physical activity.  The most current data show that 10.2 million children take part in some after-school program and this number continues to rise4.

CDC’s funded partner, the National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability (NCHPAD), is working with one such after-school program, Girls on the Run, to make the program more inclusive of young girls with disabilities.

Girls on the Run is a physical activity-based positive youth development program for young girls in grades 3 through 8. The program uses a fun, experience-based curriculum to teach life skills through dynamic, interactive lessons and running games.  Running and physical activity are used to inspire and to motivate the girls, to encourage lifelong health and fitness, and to build confidence through accomplishment. At the end of each 10-week season, the girls, their coaches, and running buddies (family and community volunteers) complete a celebratory 5k running event that gives them a tangible sense of achievement and a framework for setting and achieving life goals.

May is Mental Health Month

Since 1949, Mental Health America and our affiliates across the country have led the observance of May is Mental Health Month by reaching millions of people through the media, local events and screenings. We welcome other organizations to join us in spreading the word that mental health is something everyone should care about by using the May is Mental Health Month toolkit materials and conducting awareness activities.

Source: Mental Health Month – Raising Mental Health Awareness

 Raising Mental Health Awareness

When we talk about health, we can’t just focus on heart health, or liver health, or brain health, and not whole health. You have to see the whole person, and make use of the tools and resources that benefit minds and bodies together. That’s why this year, our May is Mental Health Month theme is Fitness #4Mind4Body. We’ll focus on what we as individuals can do to be fit for our own futures – no matter where we happen to be on our own personal journeys to health and wellness – and, most especially, before Stage 4.

Learn more about:

Responsive Practice Providing Health Care & Screenings to Individuals with Disabilities

The Responsive Practice training is online, on-demand, free for a limited time, and eligible for continuing education & continuing medical education credits. Responsive Practice enhances health care providers’ ability to deliver culturally competent, accessible care to people with intellectual, mobility, and other disabilities. Learning objectives:

  • Describe disparities in health experienced by people with disabilities compared to people without disabilities;
  • Recognize barriers to accessing health care & preventive services; and
  • Acquire strategies & approaches to provide disability-competent,responsive care.

Nurses

Southern NH AHEC is an Approved Provider of continuing nursing education by the Northeast Multistate Division (NE-MSD), an accredited approver of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

Physicians

Southern NH AHEC, accredited by the NH Medical Society, designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s). Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

1.0 contact hours. Activity Number: 1226

Responsive Practice Training Flyer 2018