Project SEARCH and HealthMatters Program 2017-2018 Employment, Health, and Wellness Webinar Series

  1. Better Health by Health Education & Sustained Employment September 28st, 2017
  2. Promoting Health and Leadership in Project SEARCH® Programs October, 12th, 2017
  3. Integrating Technology to Increase Student Interns’ Health, Fitness, and Personal Responsibilities October, 26th, 2017
  4. Using the Health Matters Curriculum with the Project SEARCH® Program Model January, 18st, 2018
  5. Mindfulness: Strategies for Building Success and Wellness in the 21st Century Workforce February, 15th, 2018


 

PLEASE NOTE

  • There is no cost for these webinars.
  • CEUs are not offered for these webinars.
  • For disability accommodations email Jasmina Sisirak (jsisirak@uic.edu) at least 10 days before the webinars.

The webinars are hosted by the HealthMatters ProgramTM in partnership with Project SEARCH® and funded by The Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Developmental Disabilities and Health (RRTCDD). The RRTCDD is funded through United States Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Community Living (ACL), National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR), Grant # 90RT5020-01-00, and a grant from the Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council.

Using the Health Matters Curriculum with the Project SEARCH® Program Model

Source: HealthMatters WebEx Event Center

Event status: Not started (Register)
Date and time: Thursday, January 18, 2018 2:00-3:00 pm (Eastern Time)
Duration: 1 hour
Description:

Project SEARCH is committed to supporting health and fitness education during the transition to employment. Accordingly, Project SEARCH partnered with UnitedHealthcare last year to provide Project SEARCH sites with Health Matters: The Exercise and Nutrition Health Education Curriculum for People with Developmental Disabilities. More recently, we were awarded a grant from the Ohio DD Council to study the use of the Health Matters curriculum in the context of Project SEARCH. As a first step, we surveyed Project SEARCH Instructors on their experience with the Health Matters curriculum and other health and fitness activities. The purpose was to learn about both the successes and obstacles that instructors encountered. The results of that survey will be presented here, and we plan to gather additional information from members of the audience in an informal focus group discussion. Ultimately, we plan to create and test a clear set of guidelines for integrating the Health Matters curriculum into Project SEARCH in a manner that will optimize learning of health and fitness principles without interfering with the primary Project SEARCH goal of competitive employment.

PRESENTER

Maryellen Daston, PhD, Program Specialist, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, Cincinnati, OH. Maryellen is a technical writer with a background in biomedical research. Prior to her current position with Project SEARCH, she was involved with research in the field of developmental neuroscience. In her current position, Maryellen works with the Project SEARCH central administration team at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Maryellen manages the Project SEARCH database and is responsible for editing and writing content for the Project SEARCH website, articles for professional journals, and other communications. She is also involved with researching funding opportunities, writing grant proposals, and overseeing research related to Project SEARCH. In addition, Maryellen co-authored the book on the history, philosophy, and practices that define the Project SEARCH model, “High School Transition that Works: Lessons Learned from Project SEARCH”, Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.

 

PRESENTATION CONTRIBUTORS

  1. Julie Christensen, PhD, LMSW, Director, Center for Disabilities and Development (UCEDD), University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA. Julie is the Director of Iowa’s University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD), Center for Disabilities and Development (CDD), at the University of Iowa. Prior to joining CDD in May 2016, Dr. Christensen served as the Director of Employment Programs at Strong Center for Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD), at the University of Rochester Medical Center. Dr. Christensen’s background encompasses work in schools, not-for-profits, government and higher education. For the past 14 years, her career has centered around improving quality of life outcomes for at-risk youth, including youth with intellectual and development disabilities, through promoting employment and access to leisure and recreation opportunities in inclusive settings. She has considerable experience developing, administering, and evaluating federal, state and local grant-funded projects with an emphasis on cross-systems collaboration and systems change. She currently maintains a research faculty appointment in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, and adjunct appointments in the Department of Pediatrics, Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics and the University of Iowa School of Social Work. Her research is in the areas of employment, quality of life, and leisure and recreation participation of adolescents and young adults with IDD.
  2. Dennis Cleary, Co-Director of the Transition, Employment, and Technology (TET) Lab, Columbus, OH. Dennis is an Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy at The Ohio State University. His primary area of interest is transition services for young adults with disabilities and promoting their employment outcomes In partnership with the Transition group at the Nisonger Center, Dr. Cleary works to test and refine methods to support young adults in academic, social, and work environments through the use of technology, activity analysis, education, and job matching strategies. Dr. Cleary has received funding from the U.S. Department of Education.
  3. Karen Guo is an Occupational Therapy Doctoral Student at The Ohio State University in Columbus, OH.
  4. Beth Marks, RN, PhD, Research Associate Professor, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL. Beth is a Research Associate Professor in the Department of Disability and Human Development, University of Illinois at Chicago, Associate Director for Research in the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Aging with Developmental Disabilities, and President, National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities. Beth directs research programs on empowerment and advancement of persons with disabilities. She has published numerous articles and books related to health promotion, health advocacy, and primary health care for people with disabilities. She co-produced a film entitled “Open the Door, Get ‘Em a Locker: Educating Nursing Students with Disabilities.” She has also authored two books published in 2010 entitled Health Matters: The Exercise and Nutrition Health Education Curriculum for People with Developmental Disabilitiesand Health Matters for People with Developmental Disabilities: Creating a Sustainable Health Promotion Program.
  5. Jasmina Sisirak, PhD, MPH, Research Assistant Professor, University of Illinois at Chicago; Chicago, IL. Jasmina is an Associate Director of Training and Dissemination in the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Developmental Disabilities and health (RRTCDD) in the Department of Disability and Human Development at University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). Her research interests consist of nutrition, health literacy, and health promotion for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities. She coordinates several health promotion projects in the RRTCDD; and has written publications and presented papers in the area of disability, health, and nutrition. Jasmina has co-authored two books entitled Health Matters: The Exercise and Nutrition Health Education Curriculum for People with Developmental Disabilities and Health Matters for People with Developmental Disabilities: Creating a Sustainable Health Promotion Program.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

These webinars are hosted by the HealthMatters ProgramTM in partnership with Project SEARCH® and funded by The Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Developmental Disabilities and Health (RRTCDD). The RRTCDD is funded through United States Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Community Living (ACL), National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR), Grant # 90RT5020-01-00, and a grant from the Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council.

Integrating Technology to Increase Student Interns’ Health, Fitness, and Personal Responsibilities

 

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Webinar Handouts:

Description:

In this webinar, we will share our success utilizing technology to improve student interns’ health, stamina, and independence. During our first year of our Project SEARCH program we have incorporated 6 Chromebooks, 2 iPads, and Fitbits for every intern. We will demonstrate how we created Google Accounts for each intern so they have access to their own G Suites to create an email address and Google Drive where they create resumes, letters, upload photos, create presentations, and share documents that they will have access to throughout their adult lives. We will also demonstrate how we utilize Google Drive to create a shared Project SEARCH Steering committee folder so all members can collaborate and have access to documents and resources at all times. We will also share how we incorporated Fitbits into daily lessons in combination with Health Matters: The Exercise and Nutrition Health Education Curriculum for People with Developmental Disabilities. Interns record all food and water consumed during the day, plus their daily activity is tracked by logging active minutes throughout the day, calories burned, total steps, and miles traveled during the day. Project SEARCH instructor is able to make connections with intern Fitbit data and Health Matters curriculum for student interns to learn the importance of nutrition and physical activity. We were also able to identify how the Fitbit can be used to make adaptations for the Interns to improve time on task and their time management skills. With the access to two iPads we incorporated a time in and time out app that student interns utilize to sign in and out for their internship rotations and for their lunch breaks. This data is incorporated into real life math lessons.

CEUs: There will be no CEUs provided for this presentation.PRESENTERS

Mason Messinger, Project SEARCH Instructor, Kalahari Resort, Pocono Manor, PA.

Dawn Diagnault, Director of Career Options and Opportunities, Human Resources Inc., Effort, PA. Dawn is the Director of Career Options and Development at the Human Resources Center, Inc. where she has been assisting individuals with disabilities in their employment goals for almost 14 years. Ms. Daignault holds a Bachelor’s degree in Disability studies from CUNY as well as an Associate’s degree in social work. She is a member of the steering committee for the Project SEARCH-Kalahari, Poconos site and serves as the supervisor of the provider agency staff.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

These webinars are hosted by the HealthMatters ProgramTM in partnership with Project SEARCH® and funded by The Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Developmental Disabilities and Health (RRTCDD). The RRTCDD is funded through United States Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Community Living (ACL), National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR), Grant # 90RT5020-01-00, and a grant from the Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council.

Big Data and the Americans with Disabilities Act

Date Written: 2017

Abstract

While big data offers society many potential benefits, it also comes with serious risks. This Essay focuses on the concern that big data will lead to increased employment discrimination. It develops the novel argument that the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) should be amended in response to the big data phenomenon in order to protect individuals who are perceived as likely to develop physical or mental impairments in the future. Employers can obtain medical data about employees not only through the traditional means of medical examinations and inquiries, but also through the non-traditional mechanisms of social media, wellness programs, and data brokers. Information about workers’ habits, behaviors, or attributes that is derived from big data can be used to create profiles of undesirable employees. It can also be used to exclude healthy and qualified individuals whom employers regard as vulnerable to future medical problems. The ADA, which now protects only individuals with current or past disabilities and those who are perceived as having existing impairments, can no longer ignore the discrimination threats posed by predictive health data. The Essay analyzes these risks and propose a detailed statutory response to them.

Download Paper

Hoffman, Sharona, Big Data and the Americans with Disabilities Act (2017). 68 Hastings Law Journal 777 (2017); Case Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2016-33. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2841431

Internet and cell phone usage patterns among young adults with intellectual disabilities

Source: JARID

Authors Cristina Jenaro, Noelia Flores, Maribel Cruz, Ma Carmen Pérez, Vanessa Vega, Víctor A Torres

First published: 24 July 2017

Abstract

Background

The risks and opportunities associated with the use of technologies are of growing research interest. Patterns of technology usage illuminate these opportunities and risks. However, no studies have assessed the usage patterns (frequency, duration, and intensity) and related factors in young people with intellectual disabilities.

Methods

Questionnaires on Internet and cell phone usage patterns, the Internet Over-Use Scale and the Cell-Phone Over-Use Scale, as well as the Beck Depression Inventory were filled out in one-on-one interviews of 216 youth with intellectual disabilities.

Results

Young people with disabilities make more social and recreational rather than educational use of these tools, and show higher rates of excessive use of both technologies than a comparison group of 410 young people without disabilities. Also, their overuse is associated with other unhealthy behaviors.

Conclusion

The framework of support needs of people with disabilities should be considered to promote healthy Internet and cell phone use.

Prospects for an Impact Evaluation of Project SEARCH: An Evaluability Assessment

Source: Prospects for an Impact Evaluation of Project SEARCH: An Evaluability Assessment

Authors: Arif A. Mamun, Lori Timmins, and David C. Stapleton

Project SEARCH has emerged as a promising program to address the challenges related to improving employment outcomes of youth with disabilities. It is a high school to work transition program that integrates employers and businesses with other educational and community rehabilitation service providers to engage youth with disabilities in paid work experiences. Recent monitoring and evaluation efforts suggest promising employment outcomes for Project SEARCH participants, but there has not yet been a rigorous impact evaluation with a large sample to demonstrate that these outcomes are substantially better than they would be if the participants had only relied on services and supports that are available outside of Project SEARCH.

In this report we present several design options for a rigorous impact evaluation of Project SEARCH. Relying on information we gathered from document reviews and from site visits conducted for this evaluability assessment, we propose two leading evaluation designs: one under the existing setting, where we take Project SEARCH sites, students, and other partners as given; and another under a demonstration setting, where we allow for the evaluation to play a role in determining the setting within which these players interact. We also discuss a few other alternative design options that we considered, but have concluded they are less appealing than those recommended.

Employers, looking for a roadmap to make your workplace is accessible to all?

Source: Accessible Technology Action Steps: A Guide for Employers

Looking for a roadmap to ensure that the technology in your workplace is accessible to all employees and job applicants? Visit: Partnership on Employment & Accessible Technology (PEAT)

Whether you’re just getting started on accessible technology or looking for more advanced guidance, PEAT offers resources that can help. Simply check out the Action Steps below, in any order.

The Impact of Health Reform Repeal on Employment

Use this interactive map to see the state-by-state impact of repeal of federal health reform on jobs.

Source: The Impact of Health Reform Repeal on Employment – The Commonwealth Fund

Contrary to a common misconception that health reform law has been a “job killer,” this study shows that repeal of these policies may cause major job losses and economic dislocation in every state -even in states that have not expanded their Medicaid programs.

While health reform repeal would dramatically increase the number of uninsured and harm access to health care, particularly for low- and moderate-income Americans, this analysis demonstrates that the consequences could be broader and extend well beyond the health care system. Repeal could trigger major reductions in employment and substantial losses in state economic activity and state and local revenues.

While health reform repeal would dramatically increase the number of uninsured and harm access to health care, particularly for low- and moderate-income Americans, this analysis demonstrates that the consequences could be broader and extend well beyond the health care system. Repeal could trigger major reductions in employment and substantial losses in state economic activity and state and local revenues.

Hover over states to see the impact of repeal of premium tax credits and Medicaid expansion on jobs.

Or click to download a state profile available under the map.

Impact of Health Reform Repeal-US Map
Impact of Health Reform Repeal-US Map

Promoting Worksite Health | The Community Guide

Worksite policies and programs may help employees reduce health risks and improve their quality of life.

Source: Promoting Worksite Health | The Community Guide

Worksite interventions can be delivered: At the worksite (e.g., signs to encourage stair use, health education classes) At other locations (e.g., gym membership discounts, weight management counseling) Through the employee health benefits plan (e.g., flu shots, cancer screenings)

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