PCPID Releases Report on Direct Support Workforce | Administration for Community Living

February 14, 2018 The President’s Committee for People with Intellectual Disabilities (PCPID) has released its 2017 report, America’s Direct Support Workforce Crisis: Effects on People with Intellectual Disabilities, Families, Communities and the U.S. Economy.

Source: PCPID Releases Report on Direct Support Workforce | ACL Administration for Community Living

Direct support professionals (DSPs) provide services and supports that empower people with intellectual disabilities to live in the community.

In the report, PCPID notes that DSPs promote participation in the U.S. economy “by helping people with an (intellectual disability) get jobs and by enabling family members to work.”  The report describes the current state of the DSP workforce as a “crisis,” noting that the average DSP wage is $10.72, most work two or three jobs, and the average annual DSP turnover rate is 45%.

The report also explores:

  • How these issues affect individuals, families, and human services systems.
  • The factors that contribute to these issues
  • Promising practices to strengthen the direct support workforce

PCPID serves in an advisory capacity to the President of the United States and the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) promoting policies and initiatives that support independence and lifelong inclusion of people with intellectual disabilities in their respective communities. The committee includes representatives from several federal agencies and 13 citizen members.

Read the full report (PDF) or a plain-language version (PDF).

Healthy Relationships and Healthy Sexuality for People with Developmental Disability

RRTCDD 2016/17 Fall/Winter Health and Wellness Series

Presenter: Susan Kahan, MA, LCPC (skahan@uic.edu)

Play recording (1 hr 4 min)

Download Sexuality and Healthy Relationships PowerPoint Presentation 

Thursday, January 19, 2017

3:00pm | Eastern Daylight Time

Presenter Biosketch:

Susan is the clinical staff at the University of Illinois at Chicago Developmental Disability Family Clinics, Susan, provides individual and group therapy for clients with a broad range of mental health and behavioral concerns, with a special focus on trauma and sexual abuse of individuals with disabilities. Susan’s clients include children, adolescents and adults. As a member of the Coalition Against Sexual Abuse of Children with Disabilities, she provides consultation and training on trauma-focused intervention for children with disabilities to both trauma and disability agencies, and has spoken at national and international conferences on sexual abuse prevention and intervention for people with IDD. She also provides consultation on working with children with disabilities for law enforcement and child protection agencies. In addition, Susan conducts trainings on healthy sexuality and sexual abuse prevention for provider agencies, schools and parent groups.

Abstract

Everyone desires to love and be loved. The myths and misconceptions about people with intellectual and developmental disability (IDD) often lead to rules and restrictions that make healthy relationships difficult to obtain. This webinar will explore the facts and myths around relationships and sexuality for people with IDD. We will discuss the importance of laying the foundation for healthy relations early on through social skills and sexuality education. Resources and strategies for teaching healthy sexuality will be presented. In addition, we will discuss the role of healthy sexuality education as a primary prevention tool for sexual abuse and other strategies to promote sexual abuse prevention.

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand the myths and misperceptions about individuals with IDD and their impact access to education on healthy relationships and sexuality.
  2. Identify tools and strategies for teaching individuals with IDD about healthy relationships and sexuality.
  3. Understand the role of healthy relationship and sexuality education as a primary sexual abuse prevention strategy.

Smoking Among Ohioans with Disabilities

The Ohio Disability and Health Program has developed a fact sheet to raise awareness regarding smoking disparities faced by Ohioans with disabilities.

http://go.osu.edu/ODHPsmokingfacts2018 or download ODHP_Smoking-Factsheet-2018.

For further information, please contact Ann Robinson, Program Coordinator, Ohio Disability and Health Program.

Overview Smoking accounts for half a million deaths every year and is of particular concern among people with disabilities (PWD). PWD have unmet healthcare needs and disparities in overall health, chronic health conditions, and health risk behaviors. People with disabilities are especially at risk for smoking and smoking-related illness. According to 2014 data, approximately 662,107 people with disabilities in the United States were current smokers, half of whom reported trying to quit within the past year. Ohio has one of the highest smoking rate disparities (18.5%) in the United States for people with disabilities compared to people without disabilities. These findings suggest a need for effective and targeted smoking cessation programs that are accessible and culturally appropriate for people with disabilities.

At the intersection of chronic disease, disability and health services research: A scoping literature review

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dhjo.2017.12.012

Abstract

Background

There is a concerted effort underway to evaluate and reform our nation’s approach to the health of people with ongoing or elevated needs for care, particularly persons with chronic conditions and/or disabilities.

Objective

This literature review characterizes the current state of knowledge on the measurement of chronic disease and disability in population-based health services research on working age adults (age 18-64).

Methods

Scoping review methods were used to scan the health services research literature published since the year 2000, including medline, psycINFO and manual searches. The guiding question was: “How are chronic conditions and disability defined and measured in studies of healthcare access, quality, utilization or cost?”

Results

Fifty-five studies met the stated inclusion criteria. Chronic conditions were variously defined by brief lists of conditions, broader criteria-based lists, two or more (multiple) chronic conditions, or other constructs. Disability was generally assessed through ADLs/IADLs, functional limitations, activity limitations or program eligibility. A smaller subset of studies used information from both domains to identify a study population or to stratify it by subgroup.

Conclusions

There remains a divide in this literature between studies that rely upon diagnostically-oriented measures and studies that instead rely on functional, activity or other constructs of disability to identify the population of interest. This leads to wide ranging differences in population prevalence and outcome estimates. However, there is also a growing effort to develop methods that account for the overlap between chronic disease and disability and to “segment” this heterogeneous population into policy or practice relevant subgroups.

  • a The Heller School for Social Policy and Management, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA, United States
  • b National Institutes of Health, Clinical Research Center, Rehabilitation Medicine Department, Bethesda, MD, United States
  • c John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, United States
  • d Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, United States
  • e Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, GA, United States
  • f University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, United States
  • g University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, United States

The Guide to Community Preventive Services and Disability Inclusion

Source: The Guide to Community Preventive Services and Disability Inclusion – ScienceDirect

Why is this important?

  • One in five adults in the United States have some type of disability (CDC, 2017).
  • Adults with disabilities are more likely to be obese, smoke, have high blood pressure, and be physically inactive than adults without disabilities(CDC, 2017).
  • Increased risk for medical conditions, such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and some cancers are also more common among adults with disabilities (CDC, 2017).

Introduction

Approximately 40 million people in the U.S. identify as having a serious disability, and people with disabilities experience many health disparitiescompared with the general population. The Guide to Community Preventive Services (The Community Guide) identifies evidence-based programs and policies recommended by the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) to promote health and prevent disease. The Community Guide was assessed to answer the questions: are Community Guide public health intervention recommendations applicable to people with disabilities, and are adaptations required?

Methods

An assessment of 91 recommendations from The Community Guide was conducted for 15 health topics by qualitative analysis involving three data approaches: an integrative literature review (years 1980–2011), key informant interviews, and focus group discussion during 2011.

Results

Twenty-six recommended interventions would not need any adaptation to be of benefit to people with disabilities. Forty-one recommended interventions could benefit from adaptations in communication and technology; 33 could benefit from training adaptations; 31 from physical accessibility adaptations; and 16 could benefit from other adaptations, such as written policy changes and creation of peer support networks. Thirty-eight recommended interventions could benefit from one or more adaptations to enhance disability inclusion.

Conclusions

As public health and healthcare systems implement Task Force recommendations, identifying and addressing barriers to full participation for people with disabilities is important so that interventions reach the entire population. With appropriate adaptations, implementation of recommendations from The Community Guide could be successfully expanded to address the needs of people with disabilities.

Health Promotion in Community Based Organizations: Understanding the Needs and Capacity
Jasmina Sisirak, PhD, MPH and Beth Marks, PhD, RN, FAAN
May 17th, 2018

Webinar 5: Health Promotion in Community Based Organizations: Understanding the Needs and Capacity

3:00 pm, Eastern Standard Time

Register for Webinar

Presenters: Jasmina Sisirak, PhD, MPH (jsisirak@uic.edu) and Beth Marks, PhD, RN (bmarks1@uic.edu)

Abstract: Focusing only on motivating individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) to change their behaviors oftentimes results in many people returning to unhealthy behaviors because their environment does not recognize the influence and importance of organizational attitudes, policy, and “corporate cultures” on individual behavior change. We evaluated organizational health promotion programs and services, resources, organizational culture and employee’s perception of knowledge, skills and attitudes in over 70 community based organizations (CBOs) in seven states. We will share the results of our findings and recommendations for improving health promotion capacity within CBOs.

Presenter bios:

Jasmina Sisirak, PhD, MPH is an Associate Director of Training and Dissemination at the RRTCDD and the Research Assistant Professor at the Department of Disability and Human Development, University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). Jasmina received her PhD in Public Health with emphasis in Epidemiology and Community Health. Her research interests consist of nutrition, health literacy, health promotion and curriculum development for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their caregivers. Jasmina is also Associate Director of the HealthMatters Program.

Beth Marks, RN, PhD, FAAN is a Research Associate Professor at the Department of Disability and Human Development, UIC and the Associate Director for Research in the RRTCDD. Her research interests include the empowerment and advancement of persons with disabilities through health promotion, health advocacy, and primary health care. She has published numerous articles and books related to health promotion, health advocacy, and primary health care for people with disabilities. Dr. Marks is also the Director of the HealthMatters Program.

Reported gum disease as a cardiovascular risk factor in adults with intellectual disabilities

Hsieh, K., Murthy, S., Heller, T., Rimmer, J., Yen, G. (2017). Reported gum disease as a cardiovascular risk factor in adults with intellectual disabilities. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, DOI: 10.1111/jir.12438

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jir.12438/abstract

ABSTRACT

Background

Several risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) have been identified among adults with intellectual disabilities (ID). Periodontitis has been reported to increase the risk of developing a CVD in the general population. Given that individuals with ID have been reported to have a higher prevalence of poor oral health than the general population, the purpose of this study was to determine whether adults with ID with informant reported gum disease present greater reported CVD than those who do not have reported gum disease and whether gum disease can be considered a risk factor for CVD.

Methods

Using baseline data from the Longitudinal Health and Intellectual Disability Study from which informant survey data were collected, 128 participants with reported gum disease and 1252 subjects without reported gum disease were identified. A series of univariate logistic regressions was conducted to identify potential confounding factors for a multiple logistic regression.

Results

The series of univariate logistic regressions identified age, Down syndrome, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, reported gum disease, daily consumption of fruits and vegetables and the addition of table salt as significant risk factors for reported CVD. When the significant factors from the univariate logistic regression were included in the multiple logistic analysis, reported gum disease remained as an independent risk factor for reported CVD after adjusting for the remaining risk factors. Compared with the adults with ID without reported gum disease, adults in the gum disease group demonstrated a significantly higher prevalence of reported CVD (19.5% vs. 9.7%; P = .001).

Conclusion

After controlling for other risk factors, reported gum disease among adults with ID may be associated with a higher risk of CVD. However, further research that also includes clinical indices of periodontal disease and CVD for this population is needed to determine if there is a causal relationship between gum disease and CVD.

Low Levels of Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(12), 1503; doi:10.3390/ijerph14121503

Kelly Hsieh 1,* , Thessa I. M. Hilgenkamp 2, Sumithra Murthy 1, Tamar Heller 1 and James H. Rimmer 3
1 Department of Disability and Human Development, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60609, USA
2 Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612, USA
3 School of Health Professions, University of Alabama at Birmingham, SHPB 331, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA

The paper has been published online: http://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/14/12/1503

Abstract
Adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) are more likely to lead sedentary lifestyles and have low levels of physical activity (LLPA). The present study investigated the prevalence of reported LLPA and time spent watching TV in adults with ID and identified the associated factors for these behaviors. The proxy informants of 1618 adults with ID completed the surveys regarding their health behaviors. Multiple logistic regressions were employed for LLPA and multiple linear regressions for time spent watching TV. About 60% of adults with ID had LLPA and average time spent watching TV was 3.4 h a day. Some characteristics and health and function variables were identified as associated factors. While engaging in community activities and involvement in Special Olympics were inversely associated with LLPA, they were not associated with time spent watching TV. Attending day/educational programs or being employed were associated with spending less time watching TV. Findings highlight differential factors associated with LLPA versus TV-watching behavior in adults with ID. Hence, a key strategy aimed at increasing physical activity includes promoting participation in social and community activities, while targeted activities for reducing sedentary behavior might focus on providing day programs or employment opportunities for adults with ID.

National Council for Aging Care’s Comprehensive Guide on Exercising for Seniors

Comprehensive Guide on Exercising for Seniors

When people think about their later years, they usually imagine a life freed from work or career commitments. They hope, too, that this new freedom will allow them to give their full attention to family, friends, and the activities they feel most passionate about. Making this dream a reality, however, requires health and independence, which in turn require a renewed commitment to staying healthy in general and to maintaining that health through exercise.

The good news, though, is that exercise confers all the same benefits to seniors that it does to those earlier in life, including increased longevity, improved mental clarity, a boost in energy, and greater strength to meet the physical demands of daily living. This is true even if you don’t start exercising until your later years. And while older people tend to become more sedentary as retirement and the challenges of old age restrict their activities, that doesn’t mean that you can’t make a reasonable course of exercise a part of your life or the life of a loved one.

With that in mind, here is everything you need to know about keeping an active lifestyle well into your senior years.

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