Mindfulness: Strategies for Building Success and Wellness in the 21st Century Workforce

Source: HealthMatters Program WebEx Event Center

Event status: Not started (Register)
Date and time: Thursday, February 15, 2018 2:00-3:00 pm (Eastern Time)
Description:

This webinar will discuss the use of mindfulness strategies for building success and wellness among people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) within their worksites. “Mindfulness tools” will be reviewed for participants to incorporate with their students and employees with IDD in the classroom or in the workplace.

CEUs: There will be no CEUs provided for this presentation.

PRESENTER

Stefanie Patterson, Cape Cod, Riverview School’s Project SEARCH Instructor. Stefanie is a certified English and special education teacher and has been in the field of education for over 20 years. She is also a life-long yoga practitioner and is licensed through Finding Inner Peace Yoga School and is a member of the National Yoga Alliance & the Cape Cod Yoga Association [CCYA] with specialty certifications in pre/post-natal yoga, children/teen yoga and Mindfulness Meditation.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

These webinars are hosted by the HealthMatters ProgramTM in partnership with Project SEARCH® and funded by The Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Developmental Disabilities and Health (RRTCDD). The RRTCDD is funded through United States Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Community Living (ACL), National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR), Grant # 90RT5020-01-00, and a grant from the Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council.

Promoting Health and Leadership in Project SEARCH® Programs

 

Event status: Play recording (51 min)

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Date and time: Thursday, October 12, 2017 2:00-3:00 pm (EST)
Duration: 1 hour
Description:

For people with intellectual/developmental disabilities, maintaining health and wellness is essential to achieving and maintaining independence, participating in society, and preventing the onset of secondary health conditions. Yet, people with disabilities (PWD) experience poorer health than the general population and alarmingly higher rates of obesity and related conditions. The University of Cincinnati UCEDD and Strong Center for Developmental Disabilities at University of Rochester implemented and evaluated the evidence – based HealthMessages Program curriculum with Project SEARCH students. HealthMessages Program is a 12-week health promotion program which uses peer-to-peer facilitation to learn about physical activity and hydration; as well as making healthy choices, lifestyle changes, and setting goals. This presentation will provide a summary of lessons learned from the pilot project.

CEUs: There will be no CEUs provided for this presentation.

PRESENTERS

Julie Christensen, PhD, LMSW, Director, Center for Disabilities and Development (UCEDD), University of Iowa, Iowa. Julie is the Director of Iowa’s University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD), Center for Disabilities and Development (CDD), at the University of Iowa. Prior to joining CDD in May 2016, Dr. Christensen served as the Director of Employment Programs at Strong Center for Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD), at the University of Rochester Medical Center. Dr. Christensen’s background encompasses work in schools, not-for-profits, government and higher education. For the past 14 years, her career has centered around improving quality of life outcomes for at-risk youth, including youth with intellectual and development disabilities, through promoting employment and access to leisure and recreation opportunities in inclusive settings. She has considerable experience developing, administering, and evaluating federal, state and local grant-funded projects with an emphasis on cross-systems collaboration and systems change. She currently maintains a research faculty appointment in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, and adjunct appointments in the Department of Pediatrics, Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics and the University of Iowa School of Social Work. Her research is in the areas of employment, quality of life, and leisure and recreation participation of adolescents and young adults with IDD.

Melissa Pennise, M.P.H., Sr. Health Project Coordinator – Health Disparities, University of Rochester Medical Center, Golisano Children’s Hospital. Melissa joined Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics in 2014. She previously worked at the Monroe County Department of Public Health where she worked in the Communicable Disease Control and Prevention Division. Melissa’s public health interests include data-driven quality improvement, and access to healthcare for vulnerable populations..

PRESENTATION CONTRIBUTOR

Maryellen Daston, PhD, Program Specialist, Project SEARCH, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, Cincinnati, OH. Maryellen is is a technical writer with a background in biomedical research. Prior to her current position with Project SEARCH, she was involved with research in the field of developmental neuroscience. In her current position, Maryellen works with the Project SEARCH central administration team at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Maryellen manages the Project SEARCH database and is responsible for editing and writing content for the Project SEARCH website, articles for professional journals, and other communications. She is also involved with researching funding opportunities, writing grant proposals, and overseeing research related to Project SEARCH. In addition, Maryellen co-authored the book on the history, philosophy, and practices that define the Project SEARCH model, “High School Transition that Works: Lessons Learned from Project SEARCH”, Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

These webinars are hosted by the HealthMatters ProgramTM in partnership with Project SEARCH® and funded by The Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Developmental Disabilities and Health (RRTCDD). The RRTCDD is funded through United States Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Community Living (ACL), National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR), Grant # 90RT5020-01-00, and a grant from the Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council.

18th Annual Chronic Illness and Disability Conference: Transition from Pediatric to Adult-based Care

AUCD is proud to support the online broadcast of Baylor College of Medicine’s 18th Annual Chronic Illness and Disability Conference.

Source: AUCD

Participate Remotely

All MCH Training Programs and UCEDDs are invited and encouraged to participate remotely by hosting a live stream of this conference for trainees, faculty, staff, families, and others at your center or program. Eligible broadcast sites include MCH training programs, UCEDDs, and Title V programs. This is an excellent opportunity for your trainees and staff to gain in-depth coverage of a range of transition issues at a very low cost of $150 per site.

An Engaging Agenda

Hosted by Baylor College of Medicine and available nationwide through an AUCD-sponsored live broadcast, this year’s conference is shaping up to be a valuable resource for the AUCD network and beyond. Register as a broadcast site in order to:

  • Listen to Toronto Children’s Hospital share about the role that social media and digital communications can play in engaging transition-aged youth
  • Participate in a breakout session on Supported Decision Making
  • Learn about one LEND alumni’s work toward educate others on healthy sexuality for people with I/DD
  • Earn CME and CNE Credits, Social Work CEUs, and PT and OT CCUs without leaving the office

… and much more!

Register

To register as a broadcast site, contact Baylor College of Medicine, Office of Continuing Medical Education, at 713-798-8237 or e-mail cme@bcm.edu for instructions. For registration questions, contact Baylor’s Cicely Simon. To speak with someone at AUCD about this event, contact Sarah DeMaio

Why We Participate

“Minnesota LEND partners with Gillette Lifetime Specialty Clinic in co-hosting the live broadcast of this conference …to learn about evidence-based practices in the critical need area of healthcare transition. Gillette staff members were very excited about this opportunity to ‘attend’ Baylor’s conference at their work place. We hope to increase this type of collaborative learning each year for our clinical partners and trainees.” 

– Rebecca Dosch-Brown, MN LEND Training Coordinator

Baylor does an excellent job of addressing the task of facilitating adolescent transition as youth learn to navigate health care, post-secondary work or school, and independent living. The mixture of national and local presenters who come from clinical, research, policy, advocacy, and patient perspectives provide a well-rounded presentation of the realities of transition. The annual conference jumps starts our trainees’ knowledge and skill development regarding transition. It allows us to introduce a wide array of issues that would take us much longer to do with our own content development. We are grateful that we are able to gain so much with a relatively small investment on our part.

– David Deere, Arkansas Regional LEND Training Director

“WI LEND program works with our state Youth Health Transition Hub to host at least 2 sites in Wisconsin – Madison and Milwaukee. LEND trainees participate as they are able, but are a small part of the audience. We have mostly providers (nurses, SW, MD, other health professionals), our MCH PPC partners and trainees, and just a few families, who come to the broadcast.”

-Anne Harris, WI LEND Director

Internet and cell phone usage patterns among young adults with intellectual disabilities

Source: JARID

Authors Cristina Jenaro, Noelia Flores, Maribel Cruz, Ma Carmen Pérez, Vanessa Vega, Víctor A Torres

First published: 24 July 2017

Abstract

Background

The risks and opportunities associated with the use of technologies are of growing research interest. Patterns of technology usage illuminate these opportunities and risks. However, no studies have assessed the usage patterns (frequency, duration, and intensity) and related factors in young people with intellectual disabilities.

Methods

Questionnaires on Internet and cell phone usage patterns, the Internet Over-Use Scale and the Cell-Phone Over-Use Scale, as well as the Beck Depression Inventory were filled out in one-on-one interviews of 216 youth with intellectual disabilities.

Results

Young people with disabilities make more social and recreational rather than educational use of these tools, and show higher rates of excessive use of both technologies than a comparison group of 410 young people without disabilities. Also, their overuse is associated with other unhealthy behaviors.

Conclusion

The framework of support needs of people with disabilities should be considered to promote healthy Internet and cell phone use.

What Effect Does Transition Have on Health and Well-Being in Young People with Intellectual Disabilities? A Systematic Review

 Source: JARID

Background Transition to adulthood might be a risk period for poor health in people with intellectual disabilities. However, the present authors could find no synthesis of evidence on health and well-being outcomes during transition in this population. This review aimed to answer this question. MethodPRISMA/MOOSE guidelines were followed. Search terms were defined, electronic searches of six databases were conducted, reference lists and key journals were reviewed, and grey literature was searched. Papers were selected based on clear inclusion criteria. Data were extracted from the selected papers, and their quality was systematically reviewed. The review was prospectively registered on PROSPERO: CRD42015016905. Results A total of 15 985 articles were extracted; of these, 17 met the inclusion criteria. The results of these articles were mixed but suggested the presence of some health and well-being issues in this population during transition to adulthood, including obesity and sexual health issues. Conclusion This review reveals a gap in the literature on transition and health and points to the need for future work in this area.

Prospects for an Impact Evaluation of Project SEARCH: An Evaluability Assessment

Source: Prospects for an Impact Evaluation of Project SEARCH: An Evaluability Assessment

Authors: Arif A. Mamun, Lori Timmins, and David C. Stapleton

Project SEARCH has emerged as a promising program to address the challenges related to improving employment outcomes of youth with disabilities. It is a high school to work transition program that integrates employers and businesses with other educational and community rehabilitation service providers to engage youth with disabilities in paid work experiences. Recent monitoring and evaluation efforts suggest promising employment outcomes for Project SEARCH participants, but there has not yet been a rigorous impact evaluation with a large sample to demonstrate that these outcomes are substantially better than they would be if the participants had only relied on services and supports that are available outside of Project SEARCH.

In this report we present several design options for a rigorous impact evaluation of Project SEARCH. Relying on information we gathered from document reviews and from site visits conducted for this evaluability assessment, we propose two leading evaluation designs: one under the existing setting, where we take Project SEARCH sites, students, and other partners as given; and another under a demonstration setting, where we allow for the evaluation to play a role in determining the setting within which these players interact. We also discuss a few other alternative design options that we considered, but have concluded they are less appealing than those recommended.

A Young Person’s Guide to Health Care Transition | NCWD/Youth

Source: A Young Person’s Guide to Health Care Transition | NCWD/Youth

A Young-Persons-Guide-to-Health-Care-Transition is about making the transition from pediatric to adult health care. This brief will review topics youth should consider around transitioning to adult health care, living a healthy lifestyle, and paying for health care. Youth need to be a part of conversations about health care. Most youth rely on their parents to handle decisions about their health care and health coverage. Before you know it, you may be expected to make these decisions on your own, if you are not doing so already. This brief will provide some information and help you think about ways you can start planning now for your transition from pediatric to adult health care.

Taking charge of your health care transition goes hand in hand with helping you achieve your career and life goals. Managing your health and wellness as a young person is the first step necessary for going to school, transitioning to work, and living the life you want. To make your dreams and career goals a reality, start learning about your health, health insurance, and health care transition planning at a young age. Make it a habit to manage your health and well-being as a young person, and you will carry this skill throughout your life.

Download the PDF

New 2017 Transition Coding and Reimbursement Tip Sheet Available

Got Transition and the American Academy of Pediatrics released a new 2017 Transition Coding and Reimbursement Tipsheet 2017 to support the delivery of recommended transition services in pediatric and adult primary and specialty care settings. The new tip sheet includes a list of updated transition-related CPT codes, including the new code for transition readiness assessment, and current Medicare fees and RVUs for these services.  It also includes a new set of seven clinical vignettes with recommended CPT and ICD-10 codes. HERE for the tip sheet.

EPSDT – A Guide for States: Coverage in the Medicaid Benefit for Children and Adolescents

JUNE 2014

Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic and Treatment (EPSDT)

Available at http://www.medicaid.gov/Medicaid-CHIP-Program-Information/By-Topics/Benefits/Early-and-Periodic-Screening-Diagnostic-and-Treatment.html

Produced in collaboration with the National Health Law Program under subcontract to NORC at the University of Chicago www.NORC.org

EPSDT’s goal is to assure that individual children get the health care they need when they need it – the right care to the right child at the right time in the right setting.

“The Medicaid program’s benefit for children and adolescents is known as Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic and Treatment services, or EPSDT. EPSDT provides a comprehensive array of prevention, diagnostic, and treatment services for low-income infants, children and adolescents under age 21, as specified in Section 1905(r) of the Social Security Act (the Act). The EPSDT benefit is more robust than the Medicaid benefit for adults and is designed to assure that children receive early detection and care, so that health problems are averted or diagnosed and treated as early as possible. The goal of EPSDT is to assure that individual children get the health care they need when they need it – the right care to the right child at the right time in the right setting.”